Art in Vermont

Art in Vermont is abundant and can be found in galleries, workshops, festivals, and at artisan events. Take craft classes at nearby Fletcher Farm School for the Arts & Crafts, or at Six Loose Ladies’ fiber arts store – each just minutes away. The walls of Golden Stage Inn often feature paintings by renowned local artists. Follow the Art in Vermont gallery trail across several Southern Vermont towns, or visit during one of the Open Studio Weekends to see artists’ own workshops and ask questions about their craft.


Featured Artist: Robert Sydorowich

We are blessed this winter to be displaying several watercolors and oils by talented Vermont impressionist Robert Sydorowich. His landscapes depict Andover, VT, where he has resided for over 40 years, as well as surrounding towns such as Weathersfield, Windsor, Shrewsbury, Ludlow, Wallingford, Plymouth, Weston, Quechee, Waitsfield, and Salem. In his own words, his creations strive to be “simple, focused, capturing the truth of the moment.” His work is featured in galleries across the state, in New York City, and even in London, as well as his own gallery in Andover. While his gallery, a converted 1000-square-foot barn, is in hibernation for the snowy months to come, a few of his paintings have found a temporary home in the Golden Stage’s living room and dining room, and the Inn’s walls are practically shivering with delight to be so beautifully adorned!

These gorgeous landscapes that our guests can now enjoy from the comfort of the indoors are reminiscent of the scenic country roads wandering to and from the Inn. Cows graze peacefully, ice-covered creeks wind between evergreen trees, snow-covered hills shelter silos and barns, and shadowy mountains undulate before lavender winter skies. Even the rusty, smoky colors of Stick Season become idyllic when interpreted by Robert Sydorowich’s paintbrush. [Stick Season, for those who may be hearing the term for the first time, is that period after the fall colors but before the winter snow, when deciduous trees are bare to the bones. Though this may sound bleak at first glance, many rejoice in November’s comforts: cider-pressing, root-crop and winter squash harvests, wool sweaters, pre-Christmas shopping, and the first wood-stove fires of the year!]

 

At this Bed & Breakfast, we do our best to support and advocate the abundance of local artistic talent available year-round. Robert Sydorowich will especially appeal to those of you who take an interest in art that reflects the natural world while giving you a full sense of what it means to call Vermont home. You can see two of the pieces featured at the Golden Stage Inn at Robert Sydorowich’s website, entitled Winter Reflections and Nancy Brook. The remaining paintings housed here cannot be viewed online, but there are several images on his website that depict scenes you’d be certain to see during a winter stay in the Okemo Valley region! These include maple syrup taps; a covered bridge; views of Okemo; and – most importantly – a cozy stove warming a sleepy cat and a pot of tea.

If you live in the area, we encourage you to seek out Robert Sydorowich’s fantastic impressionism in person, whether at a gallery near you or at our own first-floor-turned-art-gallery. This past fall, Sydorowich was featured in the Vermont Open Studio Weekend in conjunction with 130 other artisans and craftspeople. Hopefully he will be a part of the Spring 2014 Open Studio Tour as well, since it will be the Vermont Craft Council’s 20th year putting on this incredible promotion for VT crafts and art!

 

Craft Classes at the Wild and Woolly Weekend

When it comes to woolly craft classes and workshops,

I’ve always been much more of a spectator than a participant – though I admit to harboring a steady curiosity (or maybe envy is a better word).  At county fairs, I always seek out the craft barn and – okay, I’ll admit it – I get excited when I see that the spinners are doing their thing.  It’s like watching a fairy tale come to life as fluffy piles of wool are changed into spools of rough-hewn yarn.  Well, maybe it’s not quite as magical as spinning straw into gold, but it still impresses me every time! 

So it was a real treat for me to attend last year’s craft classes at Wild and Woolly Weekend, a fiber arts fair hosted by Six Loose Ladies and Fiber Arts in Vermont.  ­­­Now, I’m looking forward to this year’s installment, on April 27 and 28 at the Pointe Hotel.  This fiber arts weekend is 50% fair, 50% craft classes, and 50% social networking.   No, that’s not careless math; it’s just that this weekend has so much packed into two days that it overflows!  Veteran and virgin crafters alike really ought to swing by to check out the vendors and craft classes being offered by this energetic group of artists and do-it-yourself-ers.

Those who are new to this sort of event may have the wrong impression.  A weekend about yarn?!  Probably a bunch of old ladies sitting around with knitting needles, balls of yarn, and maybe even a cat or two by their feet.  You couldn’t be more wrong. When you look up the meaning of the phrase Wild and Woolly, you’ll find synonyms such as boisterous and unruly.  And, based on the energy that is present from the moment you walk in the door, boisterous and unruly seem like achievable descriptors!  (I mean, with a retail store name of Six Loose Ladies, you know that rowdy humor will be a part of the fun!)

The Wild and Woolly Weekend has craft classes available for the very beginner, like me, but they also have classes appropriate for those who are already pretty established in the crafting tradition.  In some classes, you’ll go home with a finished product; in others you’ll go home with enough knowledge and enthusiasm that you can tackle a new project on your own.  You can choose between three-hour classes or 50-minute ‘mini-classes.’  The topics range from spinning on a wheel or on a drop spindle; choosing and working with colors; making mug rugs (coasters), chair pads, animal pins, and mittens with needle felting; designing decorative boxes from paper collage;  and creating sparkly bracelets using beaded knitting.

Whether you’re still a latent crafter or an admitted junkie of all things wool, this event is well worth checking out.  Entrance is not only free, but there are door prizes galore.   The costs of craft classes are $5 or $10 for the mini-classes and between $30 and $45 for the 3-hour classes.  Class listings are available at the Six Loose Ladies website.

 

-Julie-Lynn, Innkeeper, Golden Stage Inn

Unexpected Reunion results in Great Art Workshop

Facebook may be most known for absorbing colossal amounts of our time, but maybe it is best known for reuniting people who would have otherwise fallen out of touch forevermore.  When a facebook friend tagged me in an old high school photo, I smiled with nostalgia as I thought, “Hey, I remember that sweater!”   (I’m so deep, eh?!) But the true delight of the photo was being ‘friended’ by a few people who didn’t yet know I was on facebook.  One of those people was Arnie Casavant, the art teacher at my Alma mater (Oliver Ames High School in North Easton, Massachusetts).  I never took art, I don’t think, but he was also our class advisor. After a few “Nice to hear from you” volleys, consistent with common facebook protocol, our dialogue politely concluded.  Yet when he posted a picture of one of his own pieces of art,  our dialogue re-opened and we found ourselves discussing the possibility of his coming to teach a landscape painting art class at the inn.  (The first one is scheduled for July 13-15, 2012.  Details on the website.)  He and his wife drove to Okemo Valley, scoping out the potential painting sites in this art-rich area, and Michael and I visited with them in our living room for a couple of hours. What fun to talk through details of the painting seminar, but also to share some experiences we’ve all had in the 20 year space since last seeing one another (24 years really, in case anyone is counting!).  I’m not a huge facebook fan but am grateful for this chance to re-encounter a person from my past — and now of my present too!